Going for Broke: How Banking Mismanagement in the Eighties Lost Billions

Going For Broke: How Banking Mismanagement In The Eighties Lost Billions

$3.00 USD

Author :Russell F Taylor

Condition : New

Binding : Soft-Back

Pages : 336

Publisher : Simon & Schuster Ltd

Language : N/A

Publication Year : N/A

This is the grim story of how, in the 1980s, bankers forgot Aesop's fable of the dog with the bone. Of how, by coveting their neighbour's business rather than nurturing their own, bankers lost their reputations, their profits and a fabulous amount of their customers' money. Unfortunately for all of us, such enormous sums cannot simply disappear. As the banks struggle to restore their solvency we, taxpayers, customers or shareholders, will have to shoulder the cost of an extraordinary string of financial disasters. In this book, the author analyzes the banking revolution in which he was intimately involved. In conclusion, he offers some hope that current banking losses will not trigger a world depression, as they did in the 1930s, but he does suggest that this new crisis will force banking reform onto the political agenda.

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SKU: GB23112
Barcode: 9780671712914
Availability : In Stock In Stock Out of stock
Categories: Business
Description

Author :Russell F Taylor

Condition : New

Binding : Soft-Back

Pages : 336

Publisher : Simon & Schuster Ltd

Language : N/A

Publication Year : N/A

This is the grim story of how, in the 1980s, bankers forgot Aesop's fable of the dog with the bone. Of how, by coveting their neighbour's business rather than nurturing their own, bankers lost their reputations, their profits and a fabulous amount of their customers' money. Unfortunately for all of us, such enormous sums cannot simply disappear. As the banks struggle to restore their solvency we, taxpayers, customers or shareholders, will have to shoulder the cost of an extraordinary string of financial disasters. In this book, the author analyzes the banking revolution in which he was intimately involved. In conclusion, he offers some hope that current banking losses will not trigger a world depression, as they did in the 1930s, but he does suggest that this new crisis will force banking reform onto the political agenda.